Listen: Kacey Musgraves Releases Two Remixes of “High Horse”

Kacey Musgraves just surprise released two remixes of her disco country jam “High Horse.” While the original is quite great itself, these remixes are pretty damn good too. As Kacey said on social media, one is for the club and the other is chill. With the deluge of music always flowing out, I thought I would pass these along and bring them to your attention. Give them a listen below:

Fusion Country’s Favorite Albums & Songs of 2018 So Far

We’ve reached the mid-point of the year, which means it’s time you read yet another mid-year music list. Isn’t it exciting? Look if you keep up with this blog, I don’t blame you for skipping out on this. These lists get tiring after you’ve read like 50 of them. But if you’re up for another list, just found Fusion Country, or need a refresher read on. Here are Fusion Country’s favorite albums and songs of 2018 so far…

(click on the album’s titles for the full review)

Kacey Musgraves – Golden Hour

Golden Hour is an excellent journey through the ups and downs of the spectrum of human emotions. Happiness, sadness, love, confusion, fun, loneliness, togetherness, cockiness, hope and more are all on display. To be human is to feel and this album makes you feel so many things. This a defining moment for Kacey Musgraves, as a songwriter and an artist. Not only showcasing her top-level songwriting, but fearlessly taking the kind of risks that so many artists are outright scared or incapable of taking with their music. Most music released today sounds timid and lacks creativity. This album is full of confidence and charges ahead without letting the unwritten rules of music hold it back. When you cast away life’s preconceptions, you’re truly free as Kacey Musgraves demonstrates with Golden Hour.

Jeff Hyde – Norman Rockwell World

Norman Rockwell World is a promising debut album from Jeff Hyde. It demonstrates that he’s an artist that is willing to get creative and adapt in a music world where many are afraid to change. But it’s this embracing of modern flourishes that will put him on many radars, while earning respect for his ability to keep the soul of country in his songs. Norman Rockwell World manages to feel both familiar and strikingly different, ensuring you won’t forget it in a world of forgettable music.

Blackberry Smoke – Find a Light

Find a Light is an album that lives up to its name, centering around finding balance and calm in a world filled with chaos and anger. Perhaps this explains what I felt like was a lighter approach production-wise to the songs in comparison to their previous two albums. This is probably the quietest album from Blackberry Smoke, a band who I think shines brightest at their hardest sounding. But despite a lighter sound, there’s still plenty of rollicking, gritty loud guitars throughout that entertain and impress. Led by the underrated songwriting of Starr, the songwriting is pretty rock solid throughout as always. There’s plenty of catchy hooks and a fair share of songs with some real meat behind the messages. Blackberry Smoke had a tough task following up the fantastic Like An Arrow, but they ultimately come through with a pretty damn good follow-up in Find a Light.

Caitlyn Smith – Starfire 

Caitlyn Smith’s Starfire is fantastic in every way. The songwriting is sharp, smart and relatable to the everyday listener. The production is smooth, flawless and really helps bring the words of the songs to life. Smith without a doubt has one of the best voices you’ll hear in music today. You’re doing yourself a disservice if you haven’t listened to this album. It’s one of the best you’ll hear in all of 2018. **

**Editor’s Note: I wrote this review at Farce The Music, who was gracious enough to give me a platform for my voice while I didn’t have a blog and before I ultimately decided to start Fusion Country. This album very much falls under the fusion country label and I would be remiss not to include. Be sure to click on the album title to read the full review. 


Be sure to check out Fusion Country’s favorite songs and singles of 2018 so far in our regularly updated playlist by clicking here. You can also check out our classic and essential reviews by clicking here.

Review – Little Big Town’s “Summer Fever”

Little Big Town has been the top superstar group in country music for years now. Yet I feel like this group doesn’t get the credit they deserve. Too often I feel they get dismissed as another pop country group, but really this is a group that puts out a lot of good music. If you’ve seen them in concert, you would know that their knowledge and appreciation of music is deep. Their last album The Breaker was one of their best and now they’re back with the lead single of their next album, “Summer Fever.” If you couldn’t tell from the title, it’s a summer song and it’s an instant jam. Just like Kacey Musgraves’ “High Horse,” this song encompasses the disco country sound (I would love to see this sound become the next trend in the genre). It’s infectious, groovy and fun, kind of reminding me of something the Bee Gees would cut. Throw in the lyrics that evoke imagery of the beach and the sounds of a “mix-tape” playing and you have a song that’s a perfect fit on a summer playlist. It’s very much the type of song that works best at a certain time of the year. I will say this song isn’t nearly as catchy as their most recent singles, but it’s the groove that wins you over immediately and the lyrics catch on with more repeated listens. Small quibble aside, Little Big Town delivers a great summer anthem in “Summer Fever.”

Grade: Great Summer Anthem

Songwriters: Cary Barlowe, Karen Fairchild, Jesse Frasure, Sam Romans

Album Review – Kacey Musgraves’ ‘Golden Hour’

The trajectory and journey of the career of Kacey Musgraves has been an interesting one. Her major label debut album Same Trailer, Different Park captured heaps of critical acclaim and attention, most notably for her open-minded anthem “Follow Your Arrow.” She then followed it up with Pageant Material, which I found to be a great album that was seemingly ignored by many in the music industry. It was disappointing, but predictable considering it didn’t have any “eye-catching headline” songs and the majority of the music journalism industry only care about their hits and not the music. So before many people who ignored Musgraves since Trailer got on her bandwagon recently, I was already highly anticipating her newest album Golden Hour. Musgraves has consistently improved as a songwriter throughout her career and I felt this could be a moment for her to really step up into the spotlight if she hit a home run. After thorough listens to Golden Hour, this album impressed me from start to finish with its bold risk taking and its deep dive into various emotions.

The album begins with the autobiographical “Slow Burn.” It appropriately has a dreamy, hazy feel as Musgraves croons about taking your time and doing it your own way. The song serves a signal for the rest of the album, which goes places many don’t dare to go in country music. “Lonely Weekend” is an anthem that assures you it’s okay to be alone at times in life. The song has a bubbly tropical feel despite the song tapping into the dark fears of missing out and social pressure. It’s the perfect song for the social media generation, describing the loneliness felt by many despite being more “connected” with each other than ever before in history. “Butterflies” goes against the sarcastic, sly personality Musgraves has largely personified in her songs up to this point. It’s cute, vulnerable and the production of the song even has the feel of butterflies fluttering through a bright blue sky. It also serves as a metaphor of how Musgraves’ outlook on love has went from the unloved caterpillar to blossoming into the pretty and appreciated butterfly.

The spacey sounds of a vocoder greet you on “Oh, What a World.” I absolutely love the utilization of the vocoder throughout this song because it helps sonically frame the lyrics. As the listener it makes you feel like you’re floating in space looking down upon the planet and admiring the mystery and vastness of it all. Then there’s the world of love between a couple, which feels just as deep and magical. This is a song where everything clicks perfectly together to create something beautiful and memorable that will stick with you. “Mother” is a more of an interlude than a song, as Musgraves soberly reflects upon the relationship with her mother after an acid trip. It’s a short and tasteful piano ballad. Musgraves expounds more upon her excitement of falling in love on “Love Is a Wild Thing.” She likens it to an exploration in the wilderness and stumbling upon it, rather than finding it. The instrumentation stays close enough to traditional, until the bridge where there’s a slick beat change that really adds a great spark to the song (credit to the producers Ian Fitchuk and Daniel Tashian).

There are several standout moments throughout this album and one of them without a doubt is “Space Cowboy.” With a title like this you expect something much different from what it is: your classic break-up country ballad. Except it’s set in modern-day, where the cowboy rides off in his Silverado instead of his horse. Then we get to the bridge of the song, which goes into a trippy, steel guitar-laced instrumental that adds more gravitas to the setting of the song (another smart production choice). It’s such a refreshing take all-around in the one of the most oft-treaded spaces in the genre. Heavy drum loops introduce “Happy & Sad,” which might be one of Kacey’s best written songs ever. The song expertly explores the complicated feelings of being happy and sad at the same time, in other words anxiety. It’s the anxiety of losing your happiness and everything crashing down when it’s all going great. I don’t think my words can properly describe how well the lyrics get to the root of this emotion and something you have to feel yourself.

“Velvet Elvis” is a fun and funky jam that will probably make a lot of summer playlists. It’s the kind of the song you want to blare loudly as you drive down the highway with the windows down. I got a strong classic country feel from the very first listen of “Wonder Woman.” It feels like something Dolly Parton would record. As Musgraves sings, she freely admits she isn’t always strong, reliable and is only a human who makes mistakes. It’s starkly honest, showing strength through an expression of fear. I previously did a whole other post dedicated to “High Horse,” a fantastic disco country jam. I will add that it’s ironic country radio casted aside Kacey and then she delivered a song that screams hit.

The album’s title track is probably the most underrated on the whole album. It’s not as flashy, catchy or fun as a lot of the other tracks. But it’s one of those songs that’s instantly comforting, like a ray of sunshine. It’s a new song, but it feels like an old favorite. The album finishes with a fantastic closer in “Rainbow.” The song captures that moment when the storm has finally passed and the light casts upon you again. It’s liberation from anguish and an embrace of capturing a sense of happiness that’s felt elusive for so long.

Golden Hour is an excellent journey through the ups and downs of the spectrum of human emotions. Happiness, sadness, love, confusion, fun, loneliness, togetherness, cockiness, hope and more are all on display. To be human is to feel and this album makes you feel so many things. This a defining moment for Kacey Musgraves, as a songwriter and an artist. Not only showcasing her top-level songwriting, but fearlessly taking the kind of risks that so many artists are outright scared or incapable of taking with their music. Most music released today sounds timid and lacks creativity. This album is full of confidence and charges ahead without letting the unwritten rules of music hold it back. When you cast away life’s preconceptions, you’re truly free as Kacey Musgraves demonstrates with Golden Hour.

Grade: 10/10

Album’s Top Highlights: Happy & Sad, Space Cowboy, High Horse, Oh What a World, Wonder Woman, Golden Hour


Producers: Daniel Tashian, Ian Fitchuk, Kacey Musgraves

Songwriters: Musgraves, Fitchuk, Tashian, Natalie Hemby, Luke Laird, Shane McAnally, Luke Dick, Jesse Frasure, Hillary Lindsey, Amy Wadge, Trent Dabbs, Tommy English

Review – Kacey Musgraves’ “High Horse”

Kacey Musgraves was one of several artists who inspired me to start Fusion Country, so naturally she’s my first review. I had the fortune to see Musgraves live about a month ago and I got to hear several of her new songs on her upcoming album Golden Hour. After hearing them, I could not be more excited for its release. This album should be on your radar. What makes this album so exciting is Kacey goes to whole new places sonically while keeping her excellent songwriting. One of the songs that excited me the most was her closing song, “High Horse.” Normally, Musgraves is known for her slower and more serious songs. But this is a certified jam and most bubbly song she’s ever done. This is a dancing song. The funky, bouncy melody grabs ahold of you and doesn’t let go until you want to hit the replay button. It’s essentially disco country. The song itself is dismissal to jerks who think they’re above the crowd and think themselves better than you. It also puts an emphasis on taking the high road, a nice reminder for all of us. Traditionalists are going to hate this, but don’t let their attitudes hold you back from enjoying this song (as this song says, don’t let them kill the buzz). Because “High Horse” is one of the most fun songs you’ll hear out of country music in 2018.

Grade: 9/10

Songwriters: Kacey Musgraves, Trent Dabbs, Tom Schleiter